Archive for the ‘Community’ Category

In 2014, the Dawn Mission Journal implemented a new blog that includes Dawn Journal entries posted from 2014 to the present. All entries can be accessed on the Dawn website.

Dawn Journal entries currently residing on the Dawn blog can be viewed by selecting Dawn Journal under the Categories Section on the top right-hand side of every post.


 

25 Feb
2015
Marc Rayman
Marc Rayman
Chief Engineer/ Mission Director, JPL

Dawn Journal | February 25

by Marc Rayman
 

Dear Fine and Dawndy Readers,

The Dawn spacecraft is performing flawlessly as it conducts the first exploration of the first dwarf planet. Each new picture of Ceres reveals exciting and surprising new details about a fascinating and enigmatic orb that has been glimpsed only as a smudge of light for more than two centuries. And yet as that fuzzy little blob comes into sharper focus, it seems to grow only more perplexing.

Dawn is showing us exotic scenery on a world that dates back to the dawn of the solar system, more than 4.5 billion years ago. Craters large and small remind us that Ceres lives in the rough and tumble environment of the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, and collectively they will help scientists develop a deeper understanding of the history and nature not only of Ceres itself but also of the solar system.

Ceres Op Nav 3 animated gif

Dawn observed Ceres for three hours, or one-third of a Cerean day, on Feb. 3-4. The spacecraft was 91,000 miles (146,000 kilometers) from the dwarf planet in this imaging session, known as OpNav 3. More detail on that one big bright spot is shown in another image below. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

Even as we discover more about Ceres, some mysteries only deepen. It certainly does not require sophisticated scientific insight to be captivated by the bright spots. What are they? At this point, the clearest answer is that the answer is unknown. One of the great rewards of exploring the cosmos is uncovering new questions, and this one captures the imagination of everyone who gazes at the pictures sent back from deep space.

Other intriguing features newly visible on the unfamiliar landscape further assure us that there will be much more to see and to learn — and probably much more to puzzle over — when Dawn flies in closer and acquires new photographs and myriad other measurements. Over the course of this year, as the spacecraft spirals to lower and lower orbits, the view will continue to improve. In the lowest orbit, the pictures will display detail well over one hundred times finer than the RC2 pictures returned a few days ago (and shown below). Right now, however, Dawn is not getting closer to Ceres. On course and on schedule for entering orbit on March 6, Earth’s robotic ambassador is slowly separating from its destination.

“Slowly” is the key. Dawn is in the vicinity of Ceres and is not leaving. The adventurer has traveled more than 900 million miles (1.5 billion kilometers) since departing from Vesta in 2012, devoting most of the time to using its advanced ion propulsion system to reshape its orbit around the sun to match Ceres’ orbit. Now that their paths are so similar, the spacecraft is receding from the massive behemoth at the leisurely pace of about 35 mph (55 kilometers per hour), even as they race around the sun together at 38,700 mph (62,300 kilometers per hour). The probe is expertly flying an intricate course that would be the envy of any hotshot spaceship pilot. To reach its first observational orbit — a circular path from pole to pole and back at an altitude of 8,400 miles (13,500 kilometers) — Dawn is now taking advantage not only of ion propulsion but also the gravity of Ceres.

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29 Jan
2015
Marc Rayman
Marc Rayman
Chief Engineer/ Mission Director, JPL

Dawn Journal | January 29

by Marc Rayman
 

Dear Abundawnt Readers,

The dwarf planet Ceres is a giant mystery. Drawn on by the irresistible lure of exploring this exotic, alien world, Dawn is closing in on it. The probe is much closer to Ceres than the moon is to Earth.

And now it is even closer…

And now it is closer still!

What has been glimpsed as little more than a faint smudge of light amidst the stars for more than two centuries is finally coming into focus. The first dwarf planet discovered (129 years before Pluto), the largest body between the sun and Pluto that a spacecraft has not yet visited, is starting to reveal its secrets. Dawn is seeing sights never before beheld, and all of humankind is along for the extraordinary experience.

We have had a preview of Dawn’s approach phase, and in November we looked at the acrobatics the spacecraft performs as it glides gracefully into orbit. Now the adventurer is executing those intricate plans, and it is flying beautifully, just the way a seasoned space traveler should.

Dawn’s unique method of patiently, gradually reshaping its orbit around the sun with its ion propulsion system is nearly at its end. Just as two cars may drive together at high speed and thus travel at low speed relative to each other, Dawn is now close to matching Ceres’ heliocentric orbital motion. Together, they are traveling around the sun at nearly 39,000 mph (almost 64,000 kilometers per hour), or 10.8 miles per second (17.4 kilometers per second). But the spaceship is closing in on the world ahead at the quite modest relative speed of about 250 mph (400 kilometers per hour), much less than is typical for interplanetary spaceflight.

Animated Gif of Ceres

Dawn observed Ceres for an hour on Jan. 13, from a distance of 238,000 miles (383,000 kilometers). A little more than half of the surface was revealed as Ceres rotated. This imaging session is known as OpNav 1. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI

Dawn has begun its approach imaging campaign, and the pictures are wonderfully exciting. This month, we will take a more careful look at the plans for photographing Ceres. Eager readers may jump directly to the summary table, but others may want to emulate the spacecraft by taking a more leisurely approach to it, which may aid in understanding some details.

While our faithful Dawn is the star of this bold deep-space adventure (along with protoplanet Vesta and dwarf planet Ceres), the real talent is behind the scenes, as is often the case with celebrities. The success of the mission depends on the dedication and expertise of the members of the Dawn flight team, no farther from Earth than the eighth floor of JPL’s building 264 (although occasionally your correspondent goes on the roof to enjoy the sights of the evening sky). They are carefully guiding the distant spacecraft on its approach trajectory and ensuring it accomplishes all of its tasks.

To keep Dawn on course to Ceres, navigators need a good fix on where the probe and its target are. Both are far, far from Earth, so the job is not easy. In addition to the extraordinarily sophisticated but standard methods of navigating a remote interplanetary spacecraft, using the radio signal to measure its distance and speed, Dawn’s controllers use another technique now that it is in the vicinity of its destination.

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24 Dec
2014

Dawn Jingles the Season

by Dawn Education & Communications
 

As the holiday season has approached over the past several years, two members of the Dawn team have had a kick creating mission-based lyrics to the tune of three traditional carols in their free time. For your inner space-nerd ready for some holiday spirit, here are a few more flight team members, singing them. Enjoy!

Singers include Roger Klemm, Kristina Larson, Greg Whiffen, Keri Bean, Todd Barber, and Carol Polanskey

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17 Nov
2014

Dawn Soars at 2014 JPL Open House

by Dawn Education & Communications
 

Two days…
…200+ scientists and engineers…
…Live demonstrations…
…NASA’s thrilling space science.

What happens when people come together with a common mission to tell the stories of NASA and make it happen? 45,716 visitors traveled from afar to find out at the 2014 JPL Open House in Pasadena, California on October 11-12. The event, themed “Welcome to Our Universe,” invited visitors on a “ride” through the wonders of space. Highlights included a life-size model of the Curiosity rover and demonstrations from numerous space missions—including Dawn. Dawn visited giant asteroid Vesta from 2011 to 2012, and will arrive at dwarf planet Ceres in the spring of 2015. A 3-D print of protoplanet Vesta, gorgeous images, and an ion engine just like the one being used by Dawn to orbit its destinations helped the mission’s scientists and engineers tell the tale of the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) that drives the mission!

JPL Open house

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31 Oct
2014
Marc Rayman
Marc Rayman
Chief Engineer/ Mission Director, JPL

Dawn Journal | October 31

by Marc Rayman
 

Dear Dawnomalies,

Farther from Earth and from the sun than it has ever been, Dawn is on course and on schedule for its March 2015 arrival at Ceres, an enigmatic world of rock and ice. To slip gracefully into orbit around the dwarf planet, the spacecraft has been using its uniquely capable ion propulsion system to reshape its heliocentric orbit so that it matches Ceres’ orbit. Since departing the giant protoplanet Vesta in Sep. 2012, the stalwart ship has accomplished 99.46 percent of the planned ion thrusting.

What matters most for this daring mission is its ambitious exploration of two uncharted worlds (previews  of the Ceres plan were presented from December 2013 to August 2014), but this month and next, we will consider that 0.54 percent of the thrusting Dawn did not accomplish. We begin by seeing what happened on the spacecraft and in mission control. In November we will describe the implications for the approach phase of the mission. (To skip now to some highlights of the new approach schedule, click on the word “click.”)

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21 Oct
2014

In Appreciation: Dr. Gerhard Neukum

by Dawn Education & Communications
 
Dr. Gerhard Neukum

Professor of Planetary
Sciences, Freie Universität Berlin. Credit: ESA

We are remembering Gerhard Neukum today: a mentor, a friend, and a superlative colleague.

Professor Gerhard Neukum was a planetary scientist with a particular fascination for craters and the story they tell about the age and composition of a solar system body—and the solar system itself. A co-investigator on the Dawn science team, he advised with characteristic perception and tenacity.

DoubleCrater_Mar2012

Gerhard Neukum was an international expert on cratering. Double crater on giant asteroid Vesta.
Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA

Neukum’s career as a distinguished planetary scientist began in the 1970s, when he conducted research for NASA’s Apollo program as a physics student at the University of Heidelberg. Eventually he became the director of the German Aerospace Center Institute of Planetary Research before moving to the Free University of Berlin. Throughout his long and successful career he made major contributions to international space missions that visited the moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the main asteroid belt. Neukum will always be remembered for his uncompromising determination to explore the solar system. Without his charismatic leadership, planetary science would not be where it is today.

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29 May
2014

Greetings From Berlin–Grüße aus Berlin!

by Chris Russell
 

The Dawn Team Converges at the German Aerospace Agency

The Dawn spacecraft moved back in solar system time when it cruised into the main asteroid belt, first orbiting protoplanet Vesta in 2011-12, and now on its way to dwarf planet Ceres, due in March 2015. When the Dawn team met in Berlin this month, it offered an opportunity for the mission to do a bit of its own time travel.

Dawn Team at the German Aerospace Agency, Berlin, 2014

fig 1: Dawn Team at the German Aerospace Agency, Berlin, 2014

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2 May
2014
Marc Rayman
Marc Rayman
Chief Engineer/ Mission Director, JPL

The Hundredth Journal

by Marc Rayman
 
Colleague Keri Bean's festive (and delicious) cake

Colleague Keri Bean’s festive (and delicious) cake with some of the greetings used in the Dawn Journals.

I have been captivated by space since I was four years old, and my enthusiasm has grown stronger and stronger ever since. With a lifelong passion for the exploration and utilization of space, covering the science, the engineering and the pure thrill of a cosmic adventure, working on a mission to explore some of the last uncharted worlds in the inner solar system has been a dream come true for me. My work is indescribably exciting.

And although it literally is indescribable, I can’t help but try! As one facet of that effort, I started writing the Dawn Journal eight years ago. Now that I have written 100, I was invited to write a short blog to celebrate. (In other words, I’ve been asked to blog about blogging.)

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21 Mar
2014

Space Inspired “Nerd Couture”

by Dawn Education & Communications
 
Two Dawn engineers showing off their nail art

Dawn mission-inspired nail art matches the spacecraft’s solar panels.

Dawn Rocks the Community

Two members of the Dawn mission have taken space exploration to a new level, combining space—and fashion. Meet Keri Bean and Kristina Larson. Keri is a member of Dawn’s science operations team and Kristina works for the spacecraft flight team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  Their shared interest in “nerd couture” brought them together, as well as their obsession with space nail art. They like wearing fashionable clothing that also expresses their interests in space science and other “nerdy” topics. From space shuttle shoes to Dawn-inspired solar panel nails, they wear it all!

Keri Bean Dawn mission science operations, and Kristina Larson, Dawn spacecraft flight team

Keri Bean, Dawn mission science operations, and Kristina Larson, Dawn spacecraft flight team, sporting “nerd couture”

In her role in science planning and sequencing, Keri acts as the interface between different off-site science team members and the spacecraft operations team at JPL.  While an undergrad and grad student at Texas A&M University, Keri was on science teams for multiple Mars missions and now uses those skills in exploring the two largest bodies in the asteroid belt.

Kristina does similar work as part of the engineering operations team by planning and sequencing engineering activities, as well as sending commands to the spacecraft and testing them on the testbed.  She has interned on Dawn since her sophomore year at USC, where she got her undergrad and grad degrees in Aerospace Engineering. Kristina worked previously on a Mars rover as a Tactical Downlink Lead, planning activities for the rover and analyzing downlinked data.

Keri Bean and her space dress, accented by her Dawn Lego model!

Keri Bean and her space dress, accented by her Dawn Lego model!

They hope to continue to share their unique and quirky styles as well as glam ideas through the eyes of two young women and hopefully teach you about Dawn along the way—so stay tuned!