Archive for May, 2015


28 May
Marc Rayman
Marc Rayman
Chief Engineer/ Mission Director, JPL

Dawn Journal | May 28, 2015

by Marc Rayman

Dear Emboldawned Readers,

A bold adventurer from Earth is gracefully soaring over an exotic world of rock and ice far, far away. Having already obtained a treasure trove from its first mapping orbit, Dawn is now seeking even greater riches at dwarf planet Ceres as it maneuvers to its second orbit.

Animated image of Ceres

In Dawn’s first mapping orbit, it watched Ceres rotate for one full Cerean day (about nine hours) on May 3-4. The spacecraft was 8,400 miles (13,600 kilometers) over the dwarf planet’s northern hemisphere. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA. Full image and caption.

The first intensive mapping campaign was extremely productive. As the spacecraft circled 8,400 miles (13,600 kilometers) above the alien terrain, one orbit around Ceres took 15 days. During its single revolution, the probe observed its new home on five occasions from April 24 to May 8. When Dawn was flying over the night side (still high enough that it was in sunlight even when the ground below was in darkness), it looked first at the illuminated crescent of the southern hemisphere and later at the northern hemisphere.

When Dawn traveled over the sunlit side, it watched the northern hemisphere, then the equatorial regions, and finally the southern hemisphere as Ceres rotated beneath it each time. One Cerean day, the time it takes the globe to turn once on its axis, is about nine hours, much shorter than the time needed for the spacecraft to loop around its orbit. So it was almost as if Dawn hovered in place, moving only slightly as it peered down, and its instruments could record all of the sights as they paraded by.

We described the plans in much more detail in March, and they executed beautifully, yielding a rich collection of photos in visible and near infrared wavelengths, spectra in visible and infrared, and measurements of the strength of Ceres’ gravitational attraction and hence its mass.

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