Archive for October, 2014


31 Oct
Marc Rayman
Marc Rayman
Chief Engineer/ Mission Director, JPL

Dawn Journal | October 31

by Marc Rayman

Dear Dawnomalies,

Farther from Earth and from the sun than it has ever been, Dawn is on course and on schedule for its March 2015 arrival at Ceres, an enigmatic world of rock and ice. To slip gracefully into orbit around the dwarf planet, the spacecraft has been using its uniquely capable ion propulsion system to reshape its heliocentric orbit so that it matches Ceres’ orbit. Since departing the giant protoplanet Vesta in Sep. 2012, the stalwart ship has accomplished 99.46 percent of the planned ion thrusting.

What matters most for this daring mission is its ambitious exploration of two uncharted worlds (previews  of the Ceres plan were presented from December 2013 to August 2014), but this month and next, we will consider that 0.54 percent of the thrusting Dawn did not accomplish. We begin by seeing what happened on the spacecraft and in mission control. In November we will describe the implications for the approach phase of the mission. (To skip now to some highlights of the new approach schedule, click on the word “click.”)

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21 Oct

In Appreciation: Dr. Gerhard Neukum

by Dawn Education & Communications
Dr. Gerhard Neukum

Professor of Planetary
Sciences, Freie Universität Berlin. Credit: ESA

We are remembering Gerhard Neukum today: a mentor, a friend, and a superlative colleague.

Professor Gerhard Neukum was a planetary scientist with a particular fascination for craters and the story they tell about the age and composition of a solar system body—and the solar system itself. A co-investigator on the Dawn science team, he advised with characteristic perception and tenacity.


Gerhard Neukum was an international expert on cratering. Double crater on giant asteroid Vesta.
Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ UCLA/ MPS/ DLR/ IDA

Neukum’s career as a distinguished planetary scientist began in the 1970s, when he conducted research for NASA’s Apollo program as a physics student at the University of Heidelberg. Eventually he became the director of the German Aerospace Center Institute of Planetary Research before moving to the Free University of Berlin. Throughout his long and successful career he made major contributions to international space missions that visited the moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the main asteroid belt. Neukum will always be remembered for his uncompromising determination to explore the solar system. Without his charismatic leadership, planetary science would not be where it is today.

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